Utility Lineman

lineman

SALARY  RANGE POTENTIAL:
$50,000 – 100,000+ /YEAR

EDUCATION REQUIRED:
COMMUNITY COLLEGE AND/OR CERTIFIED TRAINING PROGRAM

SKILLS NEEDED:
TEAMWORK, ADAPTABILITY, + INNOVATION

SECTORS HIRING:
ENERGY UTILITIES

Where rubber meets the energy road. A career that powers the entire community–literally and figuratively.

Interested in training? See available training courses in Mississippi for this career below. You can also check out available openings below.

Average Yearly
Salary Comparison

Waitstaff - $17,6500%
Retail Salespeople - $23,8600%
FireFighters - $30,7000%
Paralegals - $42,5800%
Loan Officers - $54,5800%
Linemen - $55,7000%
Financial Assistance is Available

Utility linemen are the brains and the muscle behind making sure electric power is constantly delivered and available. In the aftermath of disastrous weather events is when utility linemen are at their best. They work carefully and quickly to restore power throughout the countryside, so our lives and well-being are not disrupted.

Lineworkers earn an average salary of about $55,000.  Experienced workers may earn $65,000 or more, and with promotions to managers or supervisors, may earn up to $100,000. Opportunities to work overtime can boost compensation for lineworkers of all skill levels. These jobs also include benefits, such as health insurance and retirement plans.

Mississippi employers generally require a high school diploma or its equivalent for these careers, and a community college degree is preferred. To find a community college program near you, click here. Some employers may require job candidates to participate in an industry-specific pre-employment test, such as those offered by the Edison Electric Institute.  Specific on-the-job lineman training programs or participation in an off-site lineman training school may be required by some Mississippi employers; however, in these instances, employers are often willing to provide a whole or partial subsidy to offset the costs of attendance.

Successful linemen must be able to climb poles or use truck-mounted buckets to reach equipment, identify defective fuses, switches, and wires, demonstrate awareness of safety standards (particularly as linemen work alongside high voltages of electricity), inspect and test power lines and other equipment, lay cables, work well in a team, be prepared to spend a large portion of the work day outdoors; and not mind heights.

Available Training Programs

Selected Openings from Mississippi Works

Recent Openings for Electrical Power-Line Installers and Repairers in Mississippi Works

Lineman 1St Class (#NLX102674270)
Entergy (Natchez, MS)
November 21, 2017
**Date:** Nov 15, 2017 **Location:** Natchez, MS, US **Company:** Entergy **Primary Location:** Mississippi-Natchez **Job Function** :Lineman **FLSA ... more

Apprentice A Lineman (APA) (#NLX100521264)
Pike Corporation (Hattiesburg, MS)
November 21, 2017
Position Summary: The Apprentice A Lineman (APA) position is a semi-skilled position in the construction, maintenance and repair of electrical ... more

Lineman C O/H 2976 / Shreveport, LA Area (#238221)
Chain Electric Co. (Hattiesburg, MS)
November 16, 2017
This Position is for a Lineman C (O/H) with an electric utility construction company servicing Shreveport, LA Area. Overview: The entry level ... more

Operator O/H 3055 / Rio Grande Valley, TX (#238231)
Chain Electric Co. (Hattiesburg, MS)
November 16, 2017
This Position is for an Operator (O/H) with an electric utility construction company servicing Rio Grande Valley, TX. Overview: Operator operates ... more

Utility linemen are the brains and the muscle behind making sure electric power is constantly delivered and available. In the aftermath of disastrous weather events is when utility linemen are at their best. They work carefully and quickly to restore power throughout the countryside, so our lives and well-being are not disrupted.

Lineworkers earn an average salary of about $55,000.  Experienced workers may earn $65,000 or more, and with promotions to managers or supervisors, may earn up to $100,000. Opportunities to work overtime can boost compensation for lineworkers of all skill levels. These jobs also include benefits, such as health insurance and retirement plans.

Mississippi employers generally require a high school diploma or its equivalent for these careers, and a community college degree is preferred. To find a community college program near you, click here. Some employers may require job candidates to participate in an industry-specific pre-employment test, such as those offered by the Edison Electric Institute.  Specific on-the-job lineman training programs or participation in an off-site lineman training school may be required by some Mississippi employers; however, in these instances, employers are often willing to provide a whole or partial subsidy to offset the costs of attendance.

Successful linemen must be able to climb poles or use truck-mounted buckets to reach equipment, identify defective fuses, switches, and wires, demonstrate awareness of safety standards (particularly as linemen work alongside high voltages of electricity), inspect and test power lines and other equipment, lay cables, work well in a team, be prepared to spend a large portion of the work day outdoors; and not mind heights.